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interactive

2007-02-15

  • Wii
    • Handful of the best little components
    • Console Game: A Short History
      • Games are social
        • Especailly console games

Neural Networks

As Inti Einhorn mentioned in his presentation (which was great, man--I've had several conversations based on it in just the past couple of days,) getting the Wii to work requires training. That'll be true of anything we build, too, especially w/r/t anything gestural.

With that in mind, I would strongly recommend that we look into neural networks as a way to train the machines. It sounds a little intimidating, but it really isn't. In fact, it ties in very closely to the reading about logic gates we've been doing so far.

IBM has a pretty good introduction to NN. In particular, read Threshold logic units (TLUs) and How a TLU Learns. The rest is pretty math heavy--though it's still good reading, if you're up for it. You can recreate AND, OR, XOR, etc. gates using neural networks pretty easily.

Non-Electronic Logic Gates

Hot on the heels of our readings in class are two unconventional examples of how logic gates work.

Light Meter Arduino Project

Arduino Light Meter: Ye olde digitalWrites and analogRead at work.Arduino Light Meter: Ye olde digitalWrites and analogRead at work.Here's an example of something simple and (potentially) practical you can make with an Arduino: a light meter!

The trick for me, if you look at the photo, was to use a voltage divider for the photoresistor. That is, the analog input comes from the point on the circuit between the photoresistor and a 1K ohm resistor.

Arduino Light Meter

Arduino Light Meter

Ye olde digitalWrites and analogRead at work.

Arduino Hacking

The Arduino coding session we had today seemed to go pretty well (though I'll let the other folks blog about what it was like on the student end of things.) We got a bunch of things blinking and buzzing, and we covered most of what you need to do to read and write digitally and analog... analogally... analogly... analogalogally... hmm, don't know the word for that. At any rate, it was fun for me.

Advanced Stuff

  • shiftOut
    • turns numbers into streams of data
    • handy for working with other chips
    • especially simple ones that don't take serial

Tutorial 3: Fun With Pot and Vibrators

Buzzy BasicsBuzzy BasicsOkay, actually, that's a pot as in potentiometer. Nyuk, nyuk. Anyway, let have some fun here!

  • Connect pot to analog in pin

Buzzy Basics

Buzzy Basics

Analog Read/Write

  • Analog pins don't require pinMode -- they are fixed
  • analog read pins are on a separate set up pins
  • analogue write pins (PWM pins) are on 9, 10, and 11
  • analogWrite takes a pin and a value (but the value must be between 0 and 255)

Copyright Mike Edwards 2006-2009. All content available under the Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike license, unless otherwise noted.

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